Image Bank

News media are welcome to download and reproduce the following images in the context of explaining neuromodulation therapies to the public. Photo credits are required where indicated, and some links to sources provided.

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Neuromodulation Images


Dr Ali Rezai in surgeryCaption: Ali Rezai, M.D., right, a director-at-large of the International Neuromodulation Society and neurosurgeon at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, implants a brain-machine interface in a man with tetraplegia as part of a clinical trial with Battelle to allow the man to voluntarily move his otherwise unresponsive arm and hand. (2014)

Credit: Photo courtesy of The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

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For additional images of Dr. Rezai or this neural bypass collaboration, see The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center's multimedia release


Nandan Lad, MD, PhDCaption: Duke University neurosurgeon Nandan Lad, M.D., Ph.D., a member of the International Neuromodulation Society, implants neurostimulators to manage chronic pain symptoms. A pacemaker-like pulse generator, shown here, sends mild electrical current along leads placed beneath the skin to stimulate nerves at the spinal cord. This stimulation can reduce the perception of pain. (2013)

Credit (required): Photo courtesy of Duke University

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For larger images, contact Duke Photography
Implantable pulse generator, leads

Caption: In spinal cord stimulation, a rounded wire is used for a temporary trial to test a patient’s response to the therapy, and either a rounded wire or paddle-shaped lead is used for a permanent implantation. (2013)

Credit (required): Photo courtesy of Duke University

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image

For larger images, contact Duke Photography

 


Closed-Loop Responsive Stimulation CT Imaging

Caption: This CT scan image depicts closed-loop responsive neurostimulation, which is undergoing clinical trials for halting seizure activity in epilepsy.

Credit: Image courtesy Dr. Chengyuan Wu, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital (2012)

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Neuromodulation trainingCaption: Dr. Chima Oluigbo, center, at a neuromodulation training session for physicians in 2012.

Credit: Image courtesy of the North American Chapter of the International Neuromodulation Society (NANS/INS) (2012)

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spinal cord stimulator implantCaption: Sacral nerve stimulation procedure.

Credit: Image courtesy Magdy Hassouna, M.D., Ph.D.

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Sacral nerve stimulationCaption: Sacral nerve stimulation procedure.

Credit: Image courtesy Magdy Hassouna, M.D., Ph.D.

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Spinal cord stimulator implantation

Caption: International Neuromodulation Society member Dr. Peter Staats, an interventional pain specialist, inserts the lead of a spinal cord stimulation system along the spine of a chronic pain patient.

Credit: Image courtesy of St. Jude Medical

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Dr. Elliot Krames and patient

Caption: Dr. Elliot Krames speaks with a patient at the Pacific Pain Treatment Center he founded in San Francisco.

Credit: Image courtesy of the International Neuromodulation Society (INS) (2013)

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cochlear implant

Caption: Cochlear implants were an early application of neuromodulation.

Credit: Image courtesy of the International Neuromodulation Society (INS) (2012)

 

 


SCS patient controller

Caption: A demonstration patient controller is shown in a clinical examination room. The controller is held near the implantable pulse generator to turn it on or off or switch between stimulation programs that have been preset for the patient. (The pacemaker-like pulse generator is often implanted on the upper buttock, or the chest wall or abdomen, depending on the neurostimulation treatment, such as spinal cord stimulation, sacral neuromodulation for some genitourinary conditions, or deep brain stimulation to manage tremor from movement disorder.)

Credit: Image courtesy of the International Neuromodulation Society (INS) (2012)

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SCS demonstration lead, IPGCaption: A demonstration pulse generator (left) and stimulation lead (right) are displayed in a clinical examination room.

Credit: Image courtesy of the International Neuromodulation Society (INS) (2012)

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Clinician holds SCS IPGCaption: International Neuromodulation Society Nordic Chapter Chairman Kaare Meier, M.D., Ph.D., of the Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, presents rechargeable implantable impulse generators that may be used in spinal cord stimulation.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

(Permission for use limited to any non-commercial purpose, with proper credit and no alteration.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


torpedo pantheraCaption: Torpedo panthera (leopard torpedo) in the Gulf of Aqaba, Egypt - a type of torpedo ray. The first described neuromodulation treatment for pain (by the Roman physician Scribonius Largus in 46 AD) was based on the electrical properties of the torpedo ray.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2013)

(Permission for use limited to any non-commercial purpose, with proper credit and no alteration.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


SCS leadsCaption: A selection of paddle leads available in 2015. A €2 coin and a US quarter are shown for comparison.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

(Permission for use limited to any non-commercial purpose, with proper credit and no alteration.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


leadsCaption: A selection of percutaneous leads available in 2015.
A €2 coin and a US quarter are shown for comparison.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

(Permission for use limited to any non-commercial purpose, with proper credit and no alteration.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


 percutaneous lead delivery devicesCaption: A selection of percutaneous lead delivery devices available in 2015. A €2 coin and a US quarter are shown for comparison.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

(Permission for use limited to any non-commercial purpose, with proper credit and no alteration.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


anchoring devicesCaption: A selection of lead anchoring devices available in 2015. A €2 coin and a US quarter are shown for comparison.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

(Permission for use limited to any non-commercial purpose, with proper credit and no alteration.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


surgical trayCaption: At the Center for Ambulatory Surgery at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, tools await use by Dr. Kaare Meier and Prof. Jens Christian Sørensen, who implanted a spinal cord stimulation system to help manage a patient's chronic, bilateral lower extremity pain caused by failed back surgery syndrome. On the tray are scalpels, scissors, bipolar, retractor, local analgesic, and a loss-of-resistance syringe.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

Written permission has been obtained from the patient. The picture series by Dariusz Orlowski, Ph.D. is not intended to serve as endorsement of particular products or manufacturers and is published for educational purposes only.

(The image may be reproduced for any non-commercial purpose, as long as there is proper credit given and the picture is not altered.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


surgical trayCaption: Basic surgical tools.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

Written permission has been obtained from the patient. The picture series by Dariusz Orlowski, Ph.D. is not intended to serve as endorsement of particular products or manufacturers and is published for educational purposes only.

(The image may be reproduced for any non-commercial purpose, as long as there is proper credit given and the picture is not altered.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


spineCaption: Entry into the epidural space is planned using imaging as shown here, and is selected based on the expected final position of the lead (there must be some space to maneuver) and with respect to existing pathology.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

Written permission has been obtained from the patient. The picture series by Dariusz Orlowski, Ph.D. is not intended to serve as endorsement of particular products or manufacturers and is published for educational purposes only.

(The image may be reproduced for any non-commercial purpose, as long as there is proper credit given and the picture is not altered.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


needleCaption: Under local anesthesia, a Tuohy needle is inserted at an angle in preparation for introducing the percutaneous stimulation lead into the epidural space.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

Written permission has been obtained from the patient. The picture series by Dariusz Orlowski, Ph.D. is not intended to serve as endorsement of particular products or manufacturers and is published for educational purposes only.

(The image may be reproduced for any non-commercial purpose, as long as there is proper credit given and the picture is not altered.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


SCS imageCaption: When the needle is in the epidural space, a soft guidewire is inserted under fluoroscopic guidance.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

Written permission has been obtained from the patient. The picture series by Dariusz Orlowski, Ph.D. is not intended to serve as endorsement of particular products or manufacturers and is published for educational purposes only.

(The image may be reproduced for any non-commercial purpose, as long as there is proper credit given and the picture is not altered.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


percutaneous SCS lead implantation procedureCaption: The introducer is inserted over the guidewire.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

Written permission has been obtained from the patient. The picture series by Dariusz Orlowski, Ph.D. is not intended to serve as endorsement of particular products or manufacturers and is published for educational purposes only.

(The image may be reproduced for any non-commercial purpose, as long as there is proper credit given and the picture is not altered.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


SCS lead insertionCaption: The hybrid lead is inserted through the introducer.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

Written permission has been obtained from the patient. The picture series by Dariusz Orlowski, Ph.D. is not intended to serve as endorsement of particular products or manufacturers and is published for educational purposes only.

(The image may be reproduced for any non-commercial purpose, as long as there is proper credit given and the picture is not altered.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


SCS procedureCaption: The lead can be steered in the epidural space using a curved stylet inside the lead.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

Written permission has been obtained from the patient. The picture series by Dariusz Orlowski, Ph.D. is not intended to serve as endorsement of particular products or manufacturers and is published for educational purposes only.

(The image may be reproduced for any non-commercial purpose, as long as there is proper credit given and the picture is not altered.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


SCS implant

Caption: This fluoroscopy image shows the lead placed in the midline inside the epidural space. The tip (contact #1) is at the level of the intervertebral disc Th11/Th12.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

Written permission has been obtained from the patient. The picture series by Dariusz Orlowski, Ph.D. is not intended to serve as endorsement of particular products or manufacturers and is published for educational purposes only.

(The image may be reproduced for any non-commercial purpose, as long as there is proper credit given and the picture is not altered.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


Programming SCSCaption: The lead contacts can be programmed individually using a programming device Generally, the aim is to achieve a soft, buzzing sensation (paresthesias) in the entire pain-afflicted area, using a combination of lead (re-)placement and careful programming. Communication with the patient is essential during this stage.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

Written permission has been obtained from the patient. The picture series by Dariusz Orlowski, Ph.D. is not intended to serve as endorsement of particular products or manufacturers and is published for educational purposes only.

(The image may be reproduced for any non-commercial purpose, as long as there is proper credit given and the picture is not altered.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


ambulatory surgery centerCaption: The implanters pause for a moment of contemplation.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

Written permission has been obtained from the patient. The picture series by Dariusz Orlowski, Ph.D. is not intended to serve as endorsement of particular products or manufacturers and is published for educational purposes only.

(The image may be reproduced for any non-commercial purpose, as long as there is proper credit given and the picture is not altered.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


SCS 2nd leadCaption: If necessary, a second lead can be inserted through the introducer. This fluoroscopy image shows the second lead placed just to the right of the first.

Credit (required): Image courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark (2015)

Written permission has been obtained from the patient. The picture series by Dariusz Orlowski, Ph.D. is not intended to serve as endorsement of particular products or manufacturers and is published for educational purposes only.

(The image may be reproduced for any non-commercial purpose, as long as there is proper credit given and the picture is not altered.)

Click on image to download a 300 dpi jpg image


Brain Images


cortical surfaceCaption: Reference image of the cortical surface of the brain is used for studies about brain organization changes noticed in studies of deafness and language acquisition at the Brain Development Lab, University of Oregon.

Credit: Image courtesy Mark Dow, University of Oregon.

Although the image is in the pubic domain, the creator appreciates a link sent to dow(at)uoregon.edu

Click on image to download a larger image.


brain surface mapCaption: Whole brain.

Credit: Image courtesy National Institute of Mental Health.

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 Surface mapping of brain for researchCaption: Surface mapping of brain image for research.

Credit: Image courtesy National Institute of Mental Health.

Click on image to download a larger (rectangular) image.

 


ConnectomeCaption: Diffusion Spectrum MRI (DSI) of the human brain obtained with the MGH-UCLA Human “Connectom” Scanner acquired in 8 min. Where images of this quality were previously obtained in scans of 1 hr or longer, improved scanner performance coupled with innovations in RF coil design, MRI scanning physics, and mathematics of diffusion MRI reconstruction have reduced the total scan time by 6-fold or more (here from 48 min to 8 min). Most of these innovations will be readily transferable to most or all general-purpose MRI systems, and make possible practical high-resolution diffusion MRI on a routine basis (courtesy Laurence Wald, Van Wedeen). The fiber tracks are color-coded by direction: red=left-right, green=anterior-posterior, blue=through brain stem.

Credit: Image courtesy National Institutes of Health

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ConnectomeCaption: Connectome

Credit: Image courtesy National Institute of Mental Health

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MRI of headCaption: MRI of head.

Credit: National Library of Medicine

 

 


MRI of head

Caption: A sagittal magnetic resonance image (MRI) of the brain. National Science Foundation (NSF)-supported fundamental research led to the development of MRI technology.

Credit: Courtesy FONAR Corporation (via NSF).

Click on image to download a high-resolution TIFF image.


Academic R&D Images


Array on pennyCaption: Enlargement shows a 3-D electrode array, at the right edge of this coin, which is part of a visual aid and will be used to electrically stimulate the cortex.

Credit: National Science Foundation

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OptogeneticsCaption: Cells fluoresce in optogenetics research.

Credt: EurekAlert

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Scanning electromicrograph of a nerve ending

Caption: Electron micrograph of human neurons.

Credit: National Institute of Mental Health

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Rat hippocampus Caption: Rat hippocampus.

Credit: Image courtesy of the National Institutes of Health

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nerve vesicleCaption: Scanning electron micrograph of a nerve ending shows orange and blue vesicles containing chemical messengers about to be released.

Credit: Image by Tina Carvalho, University of Hawaii at Manoa, courtesy of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences/NIH

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Conditions That Are Current, Developing, or Investigative Indications


Alzheimer's disease brain image Caption: An imaging study used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect deterioration of white matter tracts in the brains of older adults at high risk for Alzheimer's disease. The data suggest that changes in white matter connections may be among the earliest brain changes in Alzheimer's disease, which may prove important for early detection by noninvasive imaging. (Early stage Alzheimer's disease has been subject to preliminary clinical trials of deep brain stimulation as a potential means to slow the progression of memory loss).

The basic imaging research shown here was supported in part by a grant, awarded to Brian Gold of the University of Kentucky (UK) College of Medicine, from the National Science Foundation (BCS 08-14302) that was related to understanding how white matter integrity changes may precede cognitive declines in aging. To learn more, see the UK news release the Alzheimer's Imaging Study Identifies Brain Changes. (Date of Image: June 2010)

Credit: Brian T. Gold, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky (via NSF).

Click on image to download a a high-resolution TIFF image.

Last Updated on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 01:24 PM