The International Neuromodulation Society

The Fastest-Growing, Worldwide Multidisciplinary Body Devoted to Building Knowledge of Neuromodulation

The International Neuromodulation Society (INS) is a non-profit group of clinicians, scientists and engineers dedicated to the scientific development and awareness of neuromodulation – the alteration of nerve activity through targeted delivery of a stimulus, such as electrical stimulation or chemical agents, to specific neurological sites in the body. The San Francisco-based INS was formed in 1989 and educates and promotes the field through meetings, its peer-reviewed journal Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface, explanatory content, and chapter websites. The INS also provides information for patients and produces rolling news briefs about this rapidly evolving field.

The INS Peer-Reviewed Journal – 8 Issues a Year

The INS journal Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface has a growing Impact Factor and is indexed in Index Medicus, MEDLINE and Pubmed from its first issue in 1998. Members may log in to the members-only section to read the journal online.

journal cover

+Submit a Manuscript.+


Medical Professionals can learn about various considerations concerning neuromodulation and clinic contacts. Once your preliminary questions have been answered, please use the Contact Us facility to find out more and to discuss specific objectives. Others may simply wish to join the INS and one of its related chapter societies, please use the Membership Application.

Clinical trials that involve a wide range of emerging neuromodulation approaches are listed on our Research page. Neuromodulation clinical trials address symptom control through nerve stimulation in such condition categories as:

If you are not a medical professional and you are searching for information about neuromodulation and how these types of treatment could benefit a specific condition such as treatment-resistant headache or other chronic pain syndromes, you may find the sections titled Therapies, About Neuromodulation or FAQs particularly helpful.

Members may log in and visit the members-only section’s Global Discussion Forum

What is Neuromodulation?

Breaking News Share

Article Recaps Brain-Computer Interface Progress

June 19, 2017 - A feature article summarizes the state of brain-computer interface research projects, noting that while devices are far from everyday use, they are beginning to help people who are paralyzed, and include attempts to include sensory input. (Paste Magazine)

Neuromodulation Research Database Registrants Surge After INS Congress

June 2017 - The collective database of primary neuromodulation research data, WIKISTIM, reported the largest monthly increase in registrants -- a one-month increase of more than 7% -- since the online resource was created in 2013. Its editor, International Neuromodulation Society member Jane Shipley, attributes that growth to her presentations made at the INS 13th World Congress. In the monthly newsletter, she acknowledged INS Director-at-Large Konstantin Slavin for mentioning the resource during his presentations as well. With an additional 37 registrants since May, the registered users now number 510. (WIKISTIM)

Deep Brain Stimulation Clinical Trial Addresses Affective Component of Neuropathic Pain

June 14, 2017 - International Neuromodulation Society member Andre Machado, MD, PhD, was mentioned in an article about the first prospective, randomized, controlled trial of DBS for neuropathic pain. The work was published in May 2017 in the Annals of Neurology. Co-authors included fellow INS members Scott Lempke, PhD and Kenneth Baker, PhD. In the nine patients in the cross-over trial, active stimulation did not produce at least a 50% improvement in pain disability compared to sham, but the stimulation to the ventral striatum did improve indices of the affective component of pain, such as depression, anxiety and quality of life. (Cleveland Clinic)

Spinal Cord Stimulation Improved Gait in Patients with Advanced Parkinson's Disease

June 6, 2017 - A pilot study of spinal cord stimulation in advanced Parkinson's disease, reported at the International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders (MDS) 2017, showed the intervention improved freezing of gait in five patients whose gait dysfunction did not respond to levodopa. Up to 25 patients may eventually be included in the study. (Medscape)


To see select neuromodulation news by category, as well as news about the INS in particular, please visit the Newsroom. To see archived news briefs dating back to January 2011, visit the News Archive.

Continue Reading News Briefs
Last Updated on Monday, December 12, 2016 10:01 AM