The International Neuromodulation Society

The Fastest-Growing, Worldwide Multidisciplinary Body Devoted to Building Knowledge of Neuromodulation

The International Neuromodulation Society (INS) is a non-profit group of clinicians, scientists and engineers dedicated to the scientific development and awareness of neuromodulation – the alteration of nerve activity through targeted delivery of a stimulus, such as electrical stimulation or chemical agents, to specific neurological sites in the body. The San Francisco-based INS was formed in 1989 and educates and promotes the field through meetings, its peer-reviewed journal Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface, explanatory content, and chapter websites. The INS also provides information for patients and produces rolling news briefs about this rapidly evolving field.

The INS Peer-Reviewed Journal – 8 Issues a Year

The INS journal Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface has a growing Impact Factor and is indexed in Index Medicus, MEDLINE and Pubmed from its first issue in 1998. Members may log in to the members-only section to read the journal online.

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Medical Professionals can learn about various considerations concerning neuromodulation and clinic contacts. Once your preliminary questions have been answered, please use the Contact Us facility to find out more and to discuss specific objectives. Others may simply wish to join the INS and one of its related chapter societies, please use the Membership Application.

Clinical trials that involve a wide range of emerging neuromodulation approaches are listed on our Research page. Neuromodulation clinical trials address symptom control through nerve stimulation in such condition categories as:

If you are not a medical professional and you are searching for information about neuromodulation and how these types of treatment could benefit a specific condition such as treatment-resistant headache or other chronic pain syndromes, you may find the sections titled Therapies, About Neuromodulation or FAQs particularly helpful.

Members may log in and visit the members-only section’s Global Discussion Forum

What is Neuromodulation?

Breaking News Share

FDA Approves Neurostimulator to Treat Dry Eye

April 25, 2017 - The FDA granted marketing authorization to Allergen plc for its stimulator to temporarily increase tear production in adults with dry eye. The handheld device is designed for intranasal use with disposable tips. (PR Newswire)

Non-invasive Brain Stimulation Aided Some Memory Training in Study

April 24, 2017 Researchers investigating the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) report that tDCS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in 12 subjects significantly improved performance on a verbal memory-training task and a related task, as well as a reasoning test. The overall research explored combinations of working memory training in groups of 70 volunteers total, with some tDCS administered to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and some to the right. Results appeared in the journal Neuropsychologia. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0028393216303852(Science Daily)

Case Series Indicates Sacral Nerve Stimulation Shows Promise for Refractory Constipation in Pediatric Patients

April 24, 2017 - The author of an abstract presented at the 2016 World Congress of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition concluded that sacral nerve stimulation is promising for children who have constipation that is refractory to conventional treatment. The study involved 25 patients with a mean age of 14. Despite a 25% complication rate, all patients said they would recommend the therapy to patients with similar symptoms. (Gastroenterology & Endoscopy News)

Review Summarizes Studies of Non-invasive Brain Stimulation in Spasticity Management

April 19, 2017 - Authors of a literature review about repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or transcranial direct current stimulation for spasticity management say most studies have been heterogenous. However, they write that published findings indicate "low-frequency rTMS and cathodal-tDCS over the unaffected hemisphere are more effective in reducing spasticity than high-frequency rTMS and anodal-tDCS over the affected hemisphere in chronic post-stroke." (PM & R)

Study: Transcutaneous Occipital Nerve Stimulation Lowered Migraine Intensity

April 17, 2017 - A randomized controlled clinical trial of transcutaneous occipital nerve stimulation in 110 patients with migraine found that one month of neurostimulation plus treatment with topiramate resulted in reduced headache intensity, regardless of frequency -- which was either 2 Hz, 100 Hz, or 2/100 Hz. The group that received 100 Hz stimulation plus topiramate had significant decreases in headache duration. (Pain)


To see select neuromodulation news by category, as well as news about the INS in particular, please visit the Newsroom. To see archived news briefs dating back to January 2011, visit the News Archive.

Continue Reading News Briefs
Last Updated on Monday, December 12, 2016 10:01 AM